Sunday, March 22, 2009

Sunday Poetry: Robert Frost

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village, though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.

My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake.
The only other sound's the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lovely, dark, and deep,
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep.

Robert Frost

2 Comments:

Anonymous Percy Bisque Silly said...

This is fine Poesy indeed: it rhymes; it has meter.

But whither now the Glory and the Dream? Methinks Sir Frost was the last True poet.

That said, I am on a mission...

9:45 AM  
Blogger Woody (Tokin Librul/Rogue Scholar/ Helluvafella!) said...

My two favorite Frost Poems:

Neither Out Far Nor In Deep

by Robert Frost

The people along the sand
All turn and look one way.
They turn their back on the land.
They look at the sea all day.

As long as it takes to pass
A ship keeps raising its hull;
The wetter ground like glass
Reflects a standing gull.

The land may vary more;
But wherever the truth may be—
The water comes ashore,
And the people look at the sea.

They cannot look out far.
They cannot look in deep.
But when was that ever a bar
To any watch they keep?

and
Fire & Ice

Some say the world will end in fire,
Some say in ice.
From what I've tasted of desire
I hold with those who favor fire.
But if it had to perish twice,
I think I know enough of hate
To know that for destruction ice
Is also great
And would suffice.

I like his short poems best...

11:57 AM  

Post a Comment

<< Home